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Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida - Mayo Clinic

Openmedi.orgEchinacea side effects


9/17/2014
02:23 | Author: Nick Jenkins

Echinacea side effects
Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida - Mayo Clinic

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Use cautiously in people who have or are at risk of liver disorders or are taking a large amount of echinacea. Echinacea may cause liver damage.

Research suggests that echinacea is one of the most commonly used herbal supplements in women before and during pregnancy. However, safety information is limited on the use of echinacea in breastfeeding women, pregnant women, or women who are trying to become pregnant.

Avoid in people who are allergic or sensitive to echinacea, its parts, or any members of the Asteraceae or Compositae family (such as chrysanthemums, daisies, marigolds, and ragweed).

Portions of this document last updated: Nov. 01, 2013.

Use cautiously in people who are taking agents that may be toxic to the liver (including anabolic steroids, amiodarone, methotrexate, and ketoconazole). Echinacea may cause liver inflammation.

Use tinctures cautiously in pregnant women and alcoholics, and in people who are taking disulfiram or metronidazole.

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Echinacea is likely safe when taken by mouth or applied to the skin in suggested doses for up to eight weeks.

Echinacea may also cause anxiety and nervousness, bad taste, bronchitis, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, dry throat, dry mouth, fatigue, headache, heartburn, joint pain, kidney failure, mild drowsiness, mild nausea, mouth irritation, numb tongue, pemphigus vulgaris (autoimmune disease causing blistering, sore skin), sleep problems, sperm motility, stomach pain, upset stomach, and vomiting.

Echinacea is thought to be possibly safe when used in children and in pregnant women if taken as directed. However, more safety information is needed.

Increased risk of rash has been reported after the use of echinacea for cold symptom treatment in children aged 2-11 years.

People who have asthma or atopy (tendency for allergic asthma, eye and skin allergies, food allergy, or hay fever) may be more likely to have allergic reactions after taking echinacea by mouth or applying it to the skin. Hives, itching, low blood pressure, lung spasm, rash, severe allergic reaction, shock, skin redness, and swelling under the skin have been reported with echinacea use.

Use cautiously in children who have colds. Echinacea may increase the risk of ear infection.

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Avoid using in combination with anesthesia.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration www.naturalstandard.com.

Use cautiously in people who are taking agents that may affect the immune system, agents that may affect the liver's processing of drugs, amoxicillin, corticosteroids, or kava.

Use cautiously when used long-term. Long-term echinacea may cause reduced white blood cell count. Echinacea may cause a blood disorder in which blood clots form in small blood vessels, leading to a low plaet count.

Use cautiously in people who have heart disease. Echinacea may cause abnormal or irregular heartbeat.

Caution is advised in people who are taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Use cautiously in people who have skin disorders. Echinacea may cause burning sensations, hives, itching, rashes, and skin redness.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediay if you experience side effects.

Avoid using in people who are preparing to undergo transplant surgery.

Use cautiously in people who have abnormally high iron levels, abnormal white blood cell count, AIDs, arthritis or other joint diseases, atopy (tendency for allergic asthma, eye and skin allergies, food allergy, or hay fever), autoimmune diseases, cancer, chronic headaches or migraines, collagen disease, HIV, kidney disease, mental disorders (anxiety or nervousness), multiple sclerosis, sleep disorders, stomach problems, and tuberculosis.

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Use cautiously when used in injectable form, especially for people who have diabetes, according to experts.

Avoid in people who are allergic or sensitive to echinacea, its parts, or any members of the Asteraceae or Compositae family (such as chrysanthemums, daisies, marigolds, and ragweed).

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Echinacea side effects