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Ginkgo biloba drug interactions





Ginkgo Biloba Drug Interactions

01/29/2015
01:45 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Ginkgo biloba drug interactions
Ginkgo Biloba Drug Interactions

496 medications are known to interact with Ginkgo Biloba. Includes aspirin, aspirin, CoQ10 (ubiquinone).

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Pregnancy Category N Not classified.

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The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect.

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Possible Interactions with Ginkgo Biloba University of Maryland

01/29/2015
03:50 | Author: David Perry

Ginkgo biloba drug interactions
Possible Interactions with Ginkgo Biloba University of Maryland

There has been a report of an interaction between ginkgo and nifedipine (Procardia), a calcium channel blocking drug used for blood pressure and arrhythmias.

This page was last updated: May 31, 2013.

Anticonvulsant medications -- High doses of ginkgo could decrease the effectiveness of anticonvulsant therapy, such as carbamazepine (Tegretol) or valproic acid (Depakote), in controlling seizures.

Blood-thinning medications -- Ginkgo has blood-thinning properties and therefore should not be used if you are taking anticoagulant (blood-thinning) medications, such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dipyridamole (Persantine), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), or warfarin (Coumadin).

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Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) Interactions - Drugs and Supplements

01/29/2015
05:25 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Ginkgo biloba drug interactions
Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) Interactions - Drugs and Supplements

Interactions. Interactions with Drugs. Ginkgo may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. People.

Ginkgo may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

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Ginkgo may also interact with androgen blocking herbs and supplements; antianxiety herbs and supplements; anticholinergics (blocks acetylcholine); antidepressants such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); antihistamines; anti-inflammatories; antioxidants; athletic performance enhancers; cholesterol lowering herbs and supplements; cognitive herbs and supplements; ginger; hemorrhoid herbs and supplements; herbs and supplements eliminated by the kidney; herbs and supplements for Alzheimer's, arthritis, asthma, or cancer; herbs and supplements for psychosis, seizures, tinnitus (ringing of ears), or vertigo (dizziness); herbs and supplements for sexual arousal; herbs and supplements for the brain, eyes, heart, and lungs; herbs and supplements that widen blood vessels; hormonal herbs and supplements or hormone replacement therapy; impotence herbs and supplements; iodine; herbs and supplements that increase urination; pain relief herbs and supplements; seizure threshold-lowering herbs and supplements; St.

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Fatal seizures due to potential herb-drug interactions with Ginkgo

01/29/2015
03:20 | Author: David Perry

Ginkgo biloba drug interactions
Fatal seizures due to potential herb-drug interactions with Ginkgo

J Anal Toxicol. 2005 Oct;29(7):755-8. Fatal seizures due to potential herb-drug interactions with Ginkgo biloba. Kupiec T(1), Raj V. Author information:.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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Alternative therapy including herbal drugs and complementary medicine is becoming increasingly popular. However, the rise in the incidence of herb-drug interactions is causing concern, especially in the absence of warning labels addressing potential adverse effects.

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An update on drug interactions with the herbal medicine Ginkgo

01/29/2015
01:15 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Ginkgo biloba drug interactions
An update on drug interactions with the herbal medicine Ginkgo

Curr Drug Metab. 2010 Feb;11(2):171-81. An update on drug interactions with the herbal medicine Ginkgo biloba. Abad MJ(1), Bedoya LM, Bermejo P.

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Medicinal plants are gaining in popularity due to the various advantages they offer, such as fewer side-effects, better patient compliance, relatively low cost and high accessibility as well as their high acceptability due to a long history of use. There is a widespread belief among the general public that herbal preparations are "good for humans" as they are "all natural". However, the increasing use of herbal medicinal products in the community where people are also receiving prescription medicines suggests that adverse herb-drug interactions may be have significant public health consequences. There is little understanding or appreciation of the fact that these "all natural" preparations are actually a combination of potentially biologically active compounds already existing in marketed products in unknown quantities. Among the most popular herbal products used worldwide is Ginkgo biloba, used for the treatment of cerebral insufficiency, peripheral vascular diseases, and frequently taken for the enhancement of memory function. Although the safety of Ginkgo biloba is promising, accumulated data show evidence of significant interactions with medications, which can place individual patients at great risk. In this review, we examined the literature from 2000 to 2008 and focused on the importance of the risk of drug interactions and potential side effects when Ginkgo biloba is involved. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the clinical evidence on interactions between Ginkgo biloba and drugs.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA.

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