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Ginkgo biloba tree





Ginkgo biloba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

01/29/2015
03:04 | Author: Emma Coleman

Ginkgo biloba tree
Ginkgo biloba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ginkgo biloba. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. This article is about the tree. For the Goethe poem, see Gingo biloba.

Where it occurs in the wild, it is found infrequently in deciduous forests and valleys on acidic loess (i.e. fine, silty soil) with good drainage. The soil it inhabits is typically in the pH range of 5.0 to 5.5.

According to a systemic review, the effects of ginkgo on pregnant women may include increased bleeding time, and should be avoided during lactation due to inadequate safety evidence.

Autumn leaves and fallen seeds.

Although Ginkgo biloba and other species of the genus were once widespread throughout the world, its range shrank until by two million years ago, it was restricted to a small area of China.

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Ginkgo Biloba Trees - Pictures, Facts - Landscaping - About.com

01/29/2015
01:52 | Author: Emma Coleman

Ginkgo biloba tree
Ginkgo Biloba Trees - Pictures, Facts - Landscaping - About.com

Taxonomy of Ginkgo Biloba Trees: This is a case where plant taxonomy agrees with everyday lingo. The scientific name for these plants, Ginkgo biloba is more.

Ginkgo biloba trees reach 50'-80' in height, with a spread of 30'-40'. Their uniquely fan-shaped leaves start out green but morph into a golden fall foliage. Before the whole leaf turns golden, there's sometimes a stage that I especially enjoy, during which the leaf is two-toned, with separate bands of gold and green.

USDA Plant Hardiness Zones for Ginkgo Biloba:

The tree's "good qualities" included medicinal and culinary uses, exploited for centuries in both China and Japan. Roasted nuts from Ginkgo biloba trees have long been considered a delicacy in their native China.

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Ginkgo biloba - Plant Finder - Missouri Botanical Garden

01/29/2015
01:28 | Author: David Perry

Ginkgo biloba tree
Ginkgo biloba - Plant Finder - Missouri Botanical Garden

Ginkgo biloba is a deciduous conifer (a true gymnosperm) that matures to 100' tall. Ginkgo trees are commonly called maidenhair trees in reference to the.

Ginkgo biloba is a deciduous conifer (a true gymnosperm) that matures to 100' tall. It is the only surviving member of a group of ancient plants believed to have inhabited the earth up to 150 million years ago. It features distinctive two-lobed, somewhat leathery, fan-shaped, rich green leaves with diverging (almost parallel) veins. Leaves turn bright yellow in fall. Ginkgo trees are commonly called maidenhair trees in reference to the resemblance of their fan-shaped leaves to maidenhair fern leaflets (pinnae). Ginkgos are dioecious (separate male and female trees). Nurseries typically sell only male trees (fruitless), because female trees produce seeds encased in fleshy, fruit-like coverings which, at maturity in autumn, are messy and emit a noxious, foul odor upon falling to the ground and splitting open.

Excellent selection for a variety of uses, including lawn tree, street tree or shade tree. Also effective in city parks or near commercial buildings. Thank You!

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Easily grown in average, medium moisture soil in full sun. Prefers moist, sandy, well-drained soils. Tolerant of a wide range of soil conditions, including both alkaline and acidic soils and compacted soils. Also tolerant of saline conditions, air pollution and heat. Adapts well to most urban environments.

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No serious insect or disease problems. Usually slow growing, with initial growth being somewhat sparse.

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Maidenhair tree videos, photos and facts - Ginkgo biloba ARKive

01/29/2015
03:24 | Author: Lauren Ross

Ginkgo biloba tree
Maidenhair tree videos, photos and facts - Ginkgo biloba ARKive

Ginkgo biloba, or maidenhair tree, is renowned worldwide for its medicinal properties. This remarkable tree is known as a 'living fossil', as it is the sole survivor.

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The maidenhair tree is most suited to moist, deep, sandy soils in full sunlight but is extremely adaptable to a range of stressful conditions. Indeed, it was the first tree in the vicinity of Hiroshima to bud after the atomic bomb of 1945 (3).

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Ginkgo biloba Plants Fungi At Kew - Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

01/29/2015
05:40 | Author: David Perry

Ginkgo biloba tree
Ginkgo biloba Plants Fungi At Kew - Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Ginkgo biloba, or maidenhair tree, has been described as a 'living fossil' because it is the sole survivor of an ancient group of trees older than the dinosaurs.

The maidenhair tree remains virtually unchanged today and represents the only living bridge between 'higher' and 'lower' plants (between ferns and conifers). Maidenhair trees can be extremely long-lived, the oldest recorded individual being 3,500 years old.

Ginkgo biloba is being monitored as part of the IUCN Sampled Red List Index for Plants, which aims to produce conservation assessments for a representative sample of the world’s plant species. This information will then be used to monitor trends in extinction risk and help focus conservation efforts where they are needed most.

Now, 250 years after these trees were planted, Kew is celebrating the ‘Old Lions’, which can be seen in all their splendour, still growing in the Gardens.

It is planted as an ornamental or bonsai tree, or as a shade tree.

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