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Sleep Disorder Drugs (HypnoticsSedatives) Names, Side Effects

6/15/2014
04:40 | Author: David Perry

Insomnia drugs
Sleep Disorder Drugs (HypnoticsSedatives) Names, Side Effects

Learn about sleep disorder drugs (hypnotics/sedatives) and thier uses for Insomnia, a disorder in which there is difficulty sleeping, occurs.

Get tips for better sleep.

Dr. Gbemudu received her B.S. in Biochemistry from Nova Southeastern University, her PharmD degree from University of Maryland, and MBA degree from University of Baltimore. She completed a one year post-doctoral fellowship with Rutgers University and Bristol Myers Squibb.

Next: For what conditions are hypnotics used?

Hypnotic and sedative medications (henceforth referred to as hypnotics) work, in general, by increasing the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals made and released by nerves that attach to receptors on other nerves and serve as a means of communication between nerves. Increases in GABA activity in the brain produce drowsiness and facilitate or maintain sleep.

Insomnia, a disorder in which there is difficulty sleeping, occurs occasionally in most people but usually lasts only a few days. The body then "corrects" itself naturally, and people return to a normal pattern of sleep. Insomnia may be short-term (less than three weeks) or chronic, lasting longer than three weeks. Contributing factors include, but are not limited to, poor sleeping habits, stress, jet lag, medications, disease, and depression. Chronic insomnia may warrant the use of sedative/hypnotics medications; however, it is important that the treating physician perform a complete diagnostic evaluation as well as take medication and substance abuse histories, to determine if it is secondary insomnia due to other conditions that may require treatment.

Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Sleep disorder drugs (hypnotic and sedative drugs) overview.

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Insomnia Medications Learn About Side Effects - eMedicineHealth

4/14/2014
02:40 | Author: David Perry

Insomnia drugs
Insomnia Medications Learn About Side Effects - eMedicineHealth

Read about insomnia medications and their effectiveness. Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint, and over-the-counter and prescription medications.

Insomnia is defined as repeated difficulty with the initiation, duration, maintenance, or quality of sleep that occurs despite adequate time and opportunity for sleep that results in some form of daytime impairment.

Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint among people. Insomnia is defined as difficultly falling asleep, staying asleep, or both, resulting in inadequate length of sleep and/or poor quality of sleep, which may affect a person's ability to function during the day. Insomnia also may affect quality of life, work performance, and overall health. Insomnia is not a disease, but a symptom associated with a variety of medical, psychiatric, or sleep disorders. Share this Article:

What Is Insomnia?

Read More on Medscape Reference »

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Medicines for Insomnia - Sleepdex

12/23/2014
10:40 | Author: David Perry

Insomnia drugs
Medicines for Insomnia - Sleepdex

Medicines for Insomnia. Anxiolytic and Sedative-Hypnotic Drugs. Sedatives and hypnotic drugs are prescribed to produce drowsiness and to promote sleep.

Insomnia is a problem for many people, and there are many different ways to attack it, such as through exercise and changing the patient’s sleeping patterns. Another option for management is via pharmaceuticals, both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription. OTC medications tend to be used for infrequent and/or mild cases of insomnia, whereas prescription drugs are usually used for chronic and moderate-to-severe situations.

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Insomnia Medication - Medscape Reference

10/22/2014
08:00 | Author: David Perry

Insomnia drugs
Insomnia Medication - Medscape Reference

Medications used in the treatment of insomnia include nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, the selective.

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Learn About the Types of Medications Used to Treat Insomnia

8/21/2014
06:40 | Author: David Perry

Insomnia drugs
Learn About the Types of Medications Used to Treat Insomnia

Various types of drugs are used to combat insomnia. Find out what they are and how they work to relieve sleeplessness.

Medicating sleeplessness has been an ongoing, if inexact, science spanning centuries. Greeks and Romans used valerian and St. John’s wort to fight off insomnia and those herbal remedies are in use still. But modern medicine has seen fit to develop a slew of potent drugs and medications aimed at curing insomnia.

Types of insomnia meds include:

Non-prescription sleep aids like brand-names Unisom and Sominex, as well as a handful of popular antihistamines, like Benadryl and Genahist, feature the active ingredient diphenhydramine an antihistamine that is also found to be a sleep inducing drug. These are convenient and affordable for short-term, transient insomnia. They are relatively easy to use and have fewer side effects than their prescription counterparts.

Today’s battery of prescription sleep aids includes among them a few of the most widely prescribed meds for insomnia. Drugs like Ambien, Lunesta, Rozerem, and Restoril all belong either to the family of benzodiazepines or non-benzodiazepines and are useful for short-term durations. These potent medications are often fast-acting, with brief half-lives making them most useful for treating sleep onset insomnia and middle-waking insomnia. They must be used under careful doctor supervision, come with a list of side effects and could become habit forming if used long-term. But most provide exactly the boost most temporary insomnia sufferers need to get their sleep cycle back on the right track.

Doctors discovered some time ago that a number of anti-depressants could also make excellent treatments for insomnia. This off-label use is not approved by the FDA, and plenty of sleep specialists and psychiatrists rail against the practice. However, because most of the prescription sleep aids are only approved for short-term use, doctors are quick to defer to drugs like the anti-depressants trazodone and amitriptyline for their long-term applications in insomnia treatment.

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