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Long term memory





Long-term memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

11/21/2014
10:29 | Author: Nick Jenkins

Long term memory
Long-term memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Long-term memory (LTM) is the final stage of the dual memory model proposed by Atkinson and Shiffrin, in which data can be stored for long periods of time.

A couple of studies have had results that contradict the dual-store memory model. Studies showed that in spite of using distractors, there was still both a recency effect for a list of items and a contiguity effect. Another study revealed that how long an item spends in short-term memory is not the key determinant in its strength in long-term memory. Instead, whether the participant actively tries to remember the item while elaborating on its meaning determines the strength of its store in long-term memory.

Other categories of memory may also be relevant to the discussion of long term memory.

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Long Term Memory - Definition - Psychology - About.com

11/20/2014
08:02 | Author: Emma Coleman

Long term memory
Long Term Memory - Definition - Psychology - About.com

Long-term memory refers to the continuing storage of information. Learn more about the duration and types of long-term memory.

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Through the process of association and rehearsal, the content of short-term memory can become long-term memory. While long-term memory is also susceptible to the forgetting process, long-term memories can last for a matter of days to as long as many decades.

Long-term memory is usually divided into two types - declarative (explicit) memory and procedural (implicit) memory.

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Long-term memory refers to the continuing storage of information. In Freudian psychology, long-term memory would be call the preconscious and unconscious. This information is largely outside of our awareness, but can be called into working memory to be used when needed. Some of this information is fairly easy to recall, while other memories are much more difficult to access.

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Long-Term Memory - Types of Memory - The Human Memory

9/19/2014
06:53 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Long term memory
Long-Term Memory - Types of Memory - The Human Memory

Long-term memory is, obviously enough, intended for storage of information over a long period of time. Despite our everyday impressions of forgetting, it seems.

??? Did You Know ??? While older people have more difficulty than the young with rote memorization, such as remembering lists of words or numbers, they actually tend to perform better than young people in the recognition and recall of facts and tasks. This is partly because older people, having accumulated more real-life experience and information, have a denser network of linkages and associations in their long-term memory, and partly because they have had time to more efficiently organize their facts and experiences in a more easily accessible hierarchical form.

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Long Term Memory, Type of Memory - Posit Science

7/18/2014
04:24 | Author: Lauren Ross

Long term memory
Long Term Memory, Type of Memory - Posit Science

A long-term memory is anything you remember that happened more than a few minutes ago. Long-term memories can last for just a few days, or for many years.

Long-term memory isn't static, either. You do not imprint a memory and leave it as if untouched. Instead, you often revise the memory over time—perhaps by merging it with another memory or incorporating what others l you about the memory. As a result, your memories are not strictly constant, and are not always reliable.

There are many different forms of long-term memories. These memories aren't formed and retained in a single part of the brain; instead, the process of creating and storing long-term memories is spread throughout multiple regions. The two major subdivisions are explicit memory and implicit memory. Explicit memories are those that you consciously remember, such as an event in your life or a particular fact. Implicit memories are those that you do without thinking about, like riding a bike—you once learned how, and you remembered how, but now do it without conscious thought. Although understanding these differences in the type of memory we carry for the long-term is helpful, the divisions are fluid: different forms of memory often mix and mingle. To learn more about the different types of long-term memory, view our explicit (declarative) memory and implicit (nondeclarative) memory pages.

A long-term memory is anything you remember that happened more than a few minutes ago. Long-term memories can last for just a few days, or for many years.

Long-term memories aren't all of equal strength. Stronger memories enable you to recall an event, procedure, or fact on demand—for example, that Paris is the capital of France. Weaker memories often come to mind only through prompting or reminding.

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Long Term Memory Simply Psychology

5/17/2014
02:15 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Long term memory
Long Term Memory Simply Psychology

Theoretically, the capacity of long term memory could be unlimited, the main constraint on recall being accessibility rather than availability. Duration might be a.

Results of the study showed that participants who were tested within 15 years of graduation were about 90% accurate in identifying names and faces. After 48 years they were accurate 80% for verbal and 70% visual. Free recall was worse. After 15 years it was 60% and after 48 years it was 30% accurate.

Tulving, E. (1972). Episodic and semantic memory. In E. Tulving & W. Donaldson (Eds.), Organization of Memory, (pp. 381–403). New York: Academic Press.

Whereas, declarative knowledge involves “knowing that”, for example London is the capital of England, zebras are animals, your mums birthday etc.

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