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Long term side effects of marijuana





Short- Long-Term Effects of Marijuana - Negative Side Effects of

7/21/2014
05:30 | Author: David Perry

Long term side effects of marijuana
Short- Long-Term Effects of Marijuana - Negative Side Effects of

LONG-term effects of marijuana. Reduced resistance to common illnesses (colds, bronchitis, etc.) Suppression of the immune system; Growth disorders.

“I started using on a lark, a dare from a best friend who said that I was too chicken to smoke a joint and drink a quart of beer. I was fourteen at that time. After seven years of using and drinking I found myself at the end of the road with addiction. I was no longer using to feel euphoria, I was just using to feel some semblance of normality.

“Then I started having negative feelings about myself and my own abilities. I hated the paranoia. 1 I hated looking over my shoulder all the time. I really hated not trusting my friends. I became so paranoid that I successfully drove everyone away and found myself in the terrible place no one wants to be in—I was alone. I’d wake up in the morning and start using and keep using throughout the day.” —Paul.

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Long-term effects of cannabis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

5/20/2014
03:20 | Author: David Perry

Long term side effects of marijuana
Long-term effects of cannabis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The long term effects of cannabis have been the subject of ongoing debate. Because cannabis is illegal in most countries, research presents a challenge;.

A 2014 meta-analysis found an association between cannabis use and anxiety.

Long term exposure to cannabis poses a risk of irreversible cognitive impairment in children and pre-pubescent adolescents; other than for the very highest of doses, no similar risk has been established for adults. Negative changes in attention, psychomotor task ability, and short-term memory are associated with very recent (12 to 24 hours) marijuana use. Any long-term central nervous system effects of the residual drug are indistinguishable from variations in the user's susceptibility, or any pre-existing psychiatric disorder.

Teenage cannabis users show no difference from the general population in incidence of major depressive disorder (MDD), but an association exists between early exposure coupled with continued use into adult life and increased incidence of MDD in adulthood.

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Marijuana - Marijuana Use and Effects of Marijuana - WebMD

3/19/2014
01:30 | Author: David Perry

Long term side effects of marijuana
Marijuana - Marijuana Use and Effects of Marijuana - WebMD

Other physical effects of marijuana include: If you're a long-time user, you can have physical withdrawal symptoms -- like cravings, irritability.

Commonly Abused Prescription and Over-the-Counter Drugs WebMD Medical Reference SOURCES:

WebMD Allergy App for iPhone Featured Content.

Though occasional use isn’t usually harmful, pot can affect your body and mind any time it gets into your system. Here’s what you need to know.

Marijuana comes from the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. It has an active ingredient called THC that makes you feel high. THC and other compounds in marijuana can also affect the way your body works.

WebMD cuts through the hype to reveal the best kept secrets for healthy hair.

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Is Cannabis Really That Bad? The Scientist Magazine

11/28/2014
09:40 | Author: David Perry

Can Ambien Cause a Stroke
Is Cannabis Really That Bad? The Scientist Magazine

And while the juries remain out on both sides of the coin, one thing is clear: its use is on the rise. But even Pletcher isn't sanguine about marijuana's effects on the lungs, and suspects that there may still be long-term lung.

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Marijuana long-term effects? Go Ask Alice!

9/27/2014
07:10 | Author: David Perry

Long term side effects of marijuana
Marijuana long-term effects? Go Ask Alice!

Dear Cannabis,. The side effects of marijuana (a.k.a. pot, weed, herb, and many other names!) use are highly debated — by both politicians.

Marijuana can enter the body in a number of ways. It can be smoked, ingested through food, inhaled through vapor, or steeped as a tea, and the way marijuana enters the body can impact the type of effects a person experiences. Smoking pot causes the substance to enter the bloodstream directly, while oral consumption is first processed in the liver. Some studies indicate that when THC is taken by mouth, a substance is then produced in the liver that can alter mood or consciousness. There are also derivatives of the plant, like delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids (chemical components of the cannabis plant), which can be extracted and taken on their own.

The use of marijuana is banned by federal law, but also legalized for medicinal purposes in several states.

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