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What is prescription drug abuse? National Institute on Drug Abuse

8/22/2014
04:22 | Author: Emma Coleman

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What is prescription drug abuse? National Institute on Drug Abuse

Prescription drug abuse1 is the use of a medication without a prescription, in a way other than as prescribed, or for the experience or feelings elicited. According.

National Institute on Drug Abuse ( 2011 ). What is prescription drug abuse?. In Prescription Drug Abuse. Retrieved from /publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/what-prescription-drug-abuse.

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1 Prescription drug abuse, as defined in this report, is equivalent to the term "nonmedical use," used by many of the national surveys or data collection systems. This definition does not correspond to the definition of abuse/dependence listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV).

This series of reports simplifies the science of research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research findings of national interest.

Prescription drug abuse1 is the use of a medication without a prescription, in a way other than as prescribed, or for the experience or feelings elicited. According to several national surveys, prescription medications, such as those used to treat pain, attention deficit disorders, and anxiety, are being abused at a rate second only to marijuana among illicit drug users. The consequences of this abuse have been steadily worsening, reflected in increased treatment admissions, emergency room visits, and overdose deaths.

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Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse National

6/21/2014
02:04 | Author: Lauren Ross

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Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse National

The risks for addiction to prescription drugs increase when they are used in ways other than as prescribed (e.g., at higher doses, by different routes of.

Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs allow physicians and pharmacists to track prescriptions and help identify patients who are "doctor shopping.".

This page was last updated October 2011 Call or:

Pharmacists. Pharmacists dispense medications and can help patients understand instructions for taking them. By being watchful for prescription falsifications or alterations, pharmacists can serve as the first line of defense in recognizing prescription drug abuse. Some pharmacies have developed hotlines to alert other pharmacies in the region when a fraudulent prescription is detected.

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Option 2 DEA Nationwide Drug Take-Back Sites - Find Disposal

4/20/2014
12:06 | Author: Emma Coleman

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Option 2 DEA Nationwide Drug Take-Back Sites - Find Disposal

The final Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day was held on Saturday, September 27, 2014. On this day, thousands.

DEA announced that this was the last Take-Back Day after it recently finalized a rule that will allow authorized registrants to collect controlled substances for disposal. Now, the public may dispose of controlled substance medications at pharmacies and long-term care facilities, and through mail-back programs, provided these facilities are DEA registrants and obtain approval to become authorized collectors. Learn more about the new rules from this DEA fact sheet.

To date, consumers have disposed of at least 4.1 million pounds of unwanted medication during previous DEA National Prescription Drug Take-Back Days.

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Partnership for Prescription Assistance Home

2/19/2014
02:28 | Author: David Perry

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Partnership for Prescription Assistance Home

“After my heart attack, I did not have prescription medicine coverage. The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helped me and now I receive four of my.

Have recent natural disasters affected your ability to get access to your prescription medicines? Download the natural disaster worksheet and the PPA may be able to match you with a program to help you regain access to your medicines.

“After my heart attack, I... did not have prescription medicine coverage. The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helped me... and now I receive four of my life-saving medicines for free.” Get Help Now.

Contact the PPA about partnership opportunities.

Program Database last updated on October 16, 2014.

The Partnership for Prescription Assistance will help you find the program that’s right for you, free of charge. Remember, you will never be asked for money from the PPA.

More resources for: Patients Patient Advocates.

The Partnership for Prescription Assistance helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines by matching them with the right assistance programs. Many will get their medications free or nearly free.

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We are proud to work with many great organizations to bring assistance to the patient populations in need. Is your organization interested in partnering with the Partnership for Prescription Assistance? If so, contact us.

The Partnership for Prescription Assistance has assisted more than 8.5 million people in getting the medicines they need for free or nearly free.

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How to Dispose of Unused Medicines - Food and Drug Administration

10/28/2014
06:30 | Author: David Perry

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How to Dispose of Unused Medicines - Food and Drug Administration

A small number of medicines may be especially harmful if taken by someone other than the person for whom the medicine was prescribed.

Prescription drugs such as powerful narcotic pain relievers and other controlled substances carry instructions for flushing to reduce the danger of unintentional use or overdose and illegal abuse.

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"While FDA and the Environmental Protection Agency take the concerns of flushing certain medicines in the environment seriously, there has been no indication of environmental effects due to flushing," says Bloom. In addition, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, scientists to date have found no evidence of adverse human health effects from drug residues in the environment.

"Nonetheless, FDA does not want to add drug residues into water systems unnecessarily," says Hunter.

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