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Medicine uses and side effects





ANTIHISTAMINES - ORAL side effects, medical uses, and drug

6/11/2014
02:46 | Author: Emma Coleman

Medicine uses and side effects
ANTIHISTAMINES - ORAL side effects, medical uses, and drug

Consumer information about the medication ANTIHISTAMINES - ORAL , includes side effects, drug interactions, recommended dosages, and storage.

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A reddish, scaly rash often located over the surfaces of the elbows, knees, scalp, and around or in the ears, navel, genitals or buttocks.

Sinus Problems? It Could Be a Sinus Infection.

HOW TO USE: May be taken with food or milk if stomach upset occurs. Sustained-release or long acting tablets and capsules must be swallowed whole. Chewing or crushing the sustained-release/long acting tablets or capsules will destroy the long action and may increase side effects. For chewable tablets, chew thoroughly and swallow. Shake suspensions well before taking.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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USES: Antihistamines are used to treat rash, hives, watery eyes, runny nose, itching, and sneezing due to allergies or the common cold. They may also be used to treat motion sickness, anxiety, or as a sleep aid (for insomnia).

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What is Xanax (alprazolam)? What are the side effects of Xanax

4/10/2014
04:52 | Author: Emma Coleman

Medicine uses and side effects
What is Xanax (alprazolam)? What are the side effects of Xanax

A report in the Primary Care Companion Journal of Clinical Psychiatry noted that for treatment of panic disorder "four drug.

Signs and symptoms of Xanax dependence include: Withdrawal symptoms include:

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MLA Nordqvist, Joseph. "What is Xanax (alprazolam)? What are the side effects of Xanax?." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 3 Sep. 2014. Web. 18 Oct. 2014. < /articles/263490.php>

Xanax (Alprazolam) is a commonly prescribed drug to help alleviate symptoms of anxiety and panic.

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DrugFacts Marijuana National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

12/19/2014
04:22 | Author: David Perry

Medicine uses and side effects
DrugFacts Marijuana National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Marijuana use may have a wide range of effects, particularly on higher concentrations of THC, with a greater chance of an adverse or unpredictable reaction.

Marijuana is the most common illicit drug used in the United States. After a period of decline in the last decade, its use has been increasing among young people since 2007, corresponding to a diminishing perception of the drug’s risks that may be associated with increased public debate over the drug’s legal status. Although the federal government considers marijuana a Schedule I substance (having no medicinal uses and high risk for abuse), two states have legalized marijuana for adult recreational use, and 21 states have passed laws allowing its use as a treatment for certain medical conditions (see “Is Marijuana Medicine?”, below).

Additionally, because it seriously impairs judgment and motor coordination, marijuana contributes to risk of injury or death while driving a car.

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Aspirin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Drug Factsheets - C-Health

10/18/2014
02:24 | Author: Lauren Ross

Medicine uses and side effects
Aspirin - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Drug Factsheets - C-Health

What will it do for me? How should I use Aspirin? What form(s) does Aspirin come in? Who should NOT take Aspirin? What side effects are possible with Aspirin?.

This medication is not recommended to be used by children, teenagers, or young adults to treat fever (see the section, "Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?"). However, if recommended by a doctor in other circumstances such as to treat pain, the recommended dose is 10 mg to 15 mg per kilogram of body weight every 6 hours as needed to a maximum of 2,400 mg per day (ask your doctor or pharmacist to give you the correct dose if you are unsure).

500 mg Each pale yellow, enteric-coated caplet, with "BAYER 500" in brown ink on one side, contains 500 mg of acetylsalicylic acid.

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Do PPIs have long-term side effects? - Harvard Health Publications

8/17/2014
12:10 | Author: David Perry

Medicine uses and side effects
Do PPIs have long-term side effects? - Harvard Health Publications

The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide Long-term use Like every medication, PPIs occasionally cause side effects, including nausea and.

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Clostridium difficile is a bacterium capable of causing life-threatening cases of diarrhea (10 bowel movements a day) and conditions like colitis, an inflammation of the lining of the colon.

People get infected with C. difficile by swallowing it. By making the stomach less acidic, PPIs may leave the door ajar to infections that wouldn’t have taken hold had the acid levels been normal — a pH of 4 or less.

Yet some patients — and doctors and researchers — have wondered whether suppressing a natural process like stomach acid secretion for long periods might have unintended consequences.

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