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Prescription medicine for insomnia





Over-the-Counter Sleeping Pills for Insomnia - Sleep Center

9/16/2014
05:12 | Author: Emma Coleman

Prescription medicine for insomnia
Over-the-Counter Sleeping Pills for Insomnia - Sleep Center

Can't sleep? Non-prescription sleeping pills may be the ticket to dreamland, but beware. Some sleep medication for insomnia can cause a.

And if you have long-term sleep problems, meaning that you have difficulty more than three nights per week, it's especially important to consult your doctor. You may need prescription medication or behavioral therapy to bring on slumber. Last Updated: 8/18/2010.

Even with the wide variety of non-prescription sleep aids available, it's best to consult your doctor before popping sleeping pills or sipping sleep-promoting tea.

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Rozerem - Prescription Sleep Aid

7/15/2014
03:16 | Author: Lauren Ross

Prescription medicine for insomnia
Rozerem - Prescription Sleep Aid

Find out what makes Rozerem different from other prescription sleep aids. Prescribing Info Medication Guide. For Healthcare Professionals.

Side effects may include somnolence, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, and exacerbated insomnia.

LUVOX is a registered trademark of Solvay Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Take Rozerem right before bed.

Worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts and completed suicides, hallucinations, and nightmares can occur with Rozerem.

If you experience sleepwalking, driving, eating, or other behaviors while not fully awake, without remembering the event, contact your doctor immediay. There is a higher chance of these behaviors if you drink alcohol with Rozerem.

Don't take Rozerem if you're taking LUVOX (fluvoxamine) or have severe liver problems.

If you have an allergic reaction, such as swelling of the tongue or throat, trouble breathing, and nausea and vomiting, contact your doctor immediay, as an airway obstruction due to this reaction could be fatal.

Don't drive or operate machinery until you know how you'll react to Rozerem.

Do not drink alcohol or take other medicines that can make you sleepy when using Rozerem.

Rozerem may affect testosterone and prolactin. Consult your doctor if you experience changes in your period, libido, or problems with fertility.

Talk with your healthcare provider if you have a history of depression, mental illness, or suicidal thoughts. Call your healthcare provider if you have abnormal thoughts or behaviors, or your insomnia worsens or is not better within 7-10 days.

ROZEREM is a trademark of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.

For more information, please see the complete Prescribing Information, including the Medication Guide.

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Mothers and Sleep Medication

5/14/2014
01:24 | Author: Emma Coleman

Medical treatment of insomnia
Mothers and Sleep Medication

More mothers readily admit taking a sleep aid to get them through the night — and the stressful Sleep Medication: Mother's New Little Helper.

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Orexin receptor antagonists A new class of sleeping pill - National

3/13/2014
01:12 | Author: David Perry

Prescription medicine for insomnia
Orexin receptor antagonists A new class of sleeping pill - National

Sleep aids that target orexin action are known as “orexin receptor antagonists,” and alert, a medication that blocks its action has the potential to promote sleep.

Diagnosis & treatment of insomnia.

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Orexins (also called hypocretins) are chemicals that are naturally produced by an area of the brain called the hypothalamus. Orexins are involved in wakefulness and arousal; we know this, in part, because some people with narcolepsy (a sleep disorder that causes chronic sleepiness and involuntarily sleep) have a loss of orexin-producing neurons in that area of the brain.

Orexin Receptor Antagonists Differ from Standard Sleep Drugs by Promoting Sleep at Doses That Do Not Disrupt Cognition.

Potential new sleeping aid may improve sleep.

Sleep aids that target orexin action are known as “orexin receptor antagonists,” which means that they block the signaling of the chemical orexin in the brain. Since this chemical plays a role in keeping people awake and alert, a medication that blocks its action has the potential to promote sleep.

Scientists identified orexins in 1998, and since then there has been considerable research into their role in regulating arousal and sleep, as well as their potential as a target for the treatment of sleep disorders like insomnia. The sleep aid, Suvorexant (brand name Belsomra(R)), which targets orexins, is the first of its kind to be approved by the FDA. It will be available for purchase in the near future.

Orexin sleep aids affect a different chemical system in the brain than do current prescription and non-prescription sleep aids. Many of the commonly prescribed sleep aids cause sleepiness by enhancing GABA—a wide-reaching inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Orexin sleep aids block the brain’s receptors for the chemical orexin. Since they target a more localized area of the brain, the hope is that they will cause fewer side effects.

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