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Ranexa mechanism of action





Ranexa (Ranolazine) Drug Information Clinical Pharmacology

7/19/2014
01:34 | Author: Lauren Ross

Mechanism of action definition
Ranexa (Ranolazine) Drug Information Clinical Pharmacology

Learn about clinical pharmacology for the drug Ranexa (Ranolazine). The mechanism of action of ranolazine's antianginal effects has not been determined.

There was an increased incidence of misshapen sternebrae and reduced ossification of pelvic and cranial bones in fetuses of pregnant rats dosed at 400 mg/kg/day (2 times the MRHD on a surface area basis). Reduced ossification of sternebrae was observed in fetuses of pregnant rabbits dosed at 150 mg/kg/day (1.5 times the MRHD on a surface area basis). These doses in rats and rabbits were associated with an increased maternal mortality rate.

In vitro ranolazine and its O-demethylated metabolite are weak inhibitors of CYP3A and moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6 and P-gp.

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Ranolazine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

5/18/2014
01:28 | Author: David Perry

Mechanism of action definition
Ranolazine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ranolazine, sold under the trade name Ranexa by Gilead Sciences (who acquired It would seem – from the mechanism of action – that ranolazine may be of.

Ranolazine is not significantly metabolized by cytochrome CYP2D6. However it does inhibit this enzyme. For this reason the doses of other medications metabolized by cytochrome CYP2D6 may need to be reduced to prevent toxicity.

Ranolazine may now be used as part of a medical therapy regimen for chronic angina patients, regardless of whether or not they receive a stent or other medical intervention. Ranolazine does not reduce heart rate or blood pressure and, unlike long-acting nitrates, ranolazine can be prescribed for patients taking oral erectile dysfunction treatments.

Drugs that may interact with ranolazine include:

Ranolazine, sold under the trade name Ranexa by Gilead Sciences (who acquired the developer, CV Therapeutics in 2009), is an antianginal medication.

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Ranexa - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

3/17/2014
03:42 | Author: Emma Coleman

Mechanism
Ranexa - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

Ranexa official prescribing information for healthcare professionals. The mechanism of action of ranolazine's antianginal effects has not been determined.

Renal and Urinary Disorders – dysuria, urinary retention.

Ranolazine blocks I Kr and prolongs the QTc interval in a dose-related manner.

Drugs Metabolized by CYP2D6.

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders – hyperhidrosis.

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The maximum recommended daily dose of Ranexa is 1000 mg twice daily.

Dose and plasma concentration-related increases in the QTc interval, reductions in T wave amplitude, and, in some cases, notched T waves, have been observed in patients treated with Ranexa.

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Ranexa (ranolazine) HCP Effect

11/26/2014
05:24 | Author: Emma Coleman

Stilnox side effects
Ranexa (ranolazine) HCP Effect

The mechanism of action of ranolazine's antianginal effects has not been determined. Ranexa at therapeutic levels can inhibit the cardiac late sodium current.

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View Ranexa (ranolazine) full Prescribing Information.

Patients in CARISA received Ranexa or placebo plus standard doses of atenolol, amlodipine, or diltiazem,* as well as short-acting nitrates 2.

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† 750 mg BID is not an approved Ranexa dose. ‡ The dose of Ranexa should be limited to 500 mg twice daily in patients on diltiazem and other moderate CYP3A inhibitors.

Please see trial description below.

Gilead, the Gilead logo, and Ranexa are registered trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. or its related companies. 2014 Gilead Sciences, Inc.. RANP0084 2/14.

Combination Assessment of Ranolazine In Stable Angina (CARISA) trial description 2.

This site is intended for US healthcare professionals only.

*Limit the dose of Ranexa to 500 mg twice daily when coadministered with diltiazem, verapamil, or other moderate CYP3A inhibitors.

You are now leaving the Ranexa website. Gilead Sciences, Inc. provides these links as a convenience; however, Gilead does not control, review, or endorse third-party websites, and is not responsible for the content of the website you are about to enter.

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Ranexa39s mechanism of action added to drug label Drug Topics

9/25/2014
03:30 | Author: David Perry

Mechanism of action definition
Ranexa39s mechanism of action added to drug label Drug Topics

New information that helps elucidate the mechanism of action of ranolazine extended-release tablets ( Ranexa, CV Therapeutics) has been.

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New information that helps elucidate the mechanism of action of ranolazine extended-release tablets ( Ranexa, CV Therapeutics) has been added to the drug's prescribing information. Published data suggest that the medication works by inhibition of the excess sodium that flows into cardiac cells through sodium channels during an ischemic event. This inhibition has been shown to improve the mechanical and electrical function of the heart. Without inhibition, excess sodium can lead to a subsequent overload of calcium that interferes with proper contraction and relaxation of the organ. Ranolazine is currently indicated for the treatment of chronic angina in patients who have not achieved adequate response with other antianginal medications, and should be used in combination with amlodipine, beta-blockers, or nitrates.

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