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Sleep Disorders Medication - Medscape Reference

11/17/2014
06:25 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Sleep medication
Sleep Disorders Medication - Medscape Reference

Medication: Sleep Disorders. Sleep disorders are among the most common clinical problems encountered in medicine and psychiatry.

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Medications - Sleep Education - American Academy of Sleep Medicine

11/16/2014
04:10 | Author: David Perry

Sleep medication
Medications - Sleep Education - American Academy of Sleep Medicine

What is it? Medications can be used to reduce some sleep-related problems. Each medication targets a specific part of the brain. It is the brain that controls when.

Possible side effects? Every medication has the potential to cause some side effects. These are often very mild. Examples include dizziness and an upset stomach. But side effects also can be much more severe. You should discuss this issue in detail with your doctor. Find out about the side effects that are common with your medication. You should also find out if any risks are involved. Your doctor can help you compare the potential risks and benefits of using the drug. Women who are pregnant or nursing a baby should find out if they have special risks.

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Sleep Medication in Bipolar Disorder - Healthline

9/15/2014
02:35 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Sleep medication
Sleep Medication in Bipolar Disorder - Healthline

We all could use some extra sleep, but it's more important for bipolar patients than anyone else. Natasha Tracy runs you through the.

As I have said many times before, many professionals consider bipolar disorder to be a circadian rhythm disorder. (Your circadian rhythm is your natural body rhythm including when you sleep and wake.).

So to facilitate this type of schedule, sleep medication is often used and in a lot of patients, and it’s used every night.

Some common examples of sleep medication in bipolar disorder include:

The risks are individual to the medication (make sure to discuss them with your doctor) but it is important to realize that the risk of abuse with benzodiazepines is real and should be taken seriously.

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Sleep Medications - Sleep Aids - Sleeping Pills - Sleep Medicines

7/14/2014
12:40 | Author: David Perry

Sleep medication
Sleep Medications - Sleep Aids - Sleeping Pills - Sleep Medicines

Sleep medication information, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, and warnings. Sleeping problems or trouble sleeping are a common complaint of people.

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Medications that can affect sleep - Harvard Health Publications

5/13/2014
02:35 | Author: Kayla Henderson

Sleep medication
Medications that can affect sleep - Harvard Health Publications

A number of drugs disrupt sleep, while others can cause daytime drowsiness. Your clinician may be able to suggest alternatives.

chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDIURIL, others).

*These medications are also found in over-the-counter sleep aids. Follow us on:

levothyroxine (Levoxyl, Synthroid, others).

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nicotine patches (Nicoderm), gum (Nicorette), nasal spray or inhalers (Nicotrol), and lozenges (Commit) Insomnia, disturbing dreams Sedating antihistamines*

Suppressed REM sleep, disrupted nighttime sleep Medications containing caffeine Decreased alertness NoDoz, Vivarin, Caffedrine.

atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), propranolol (Inderal).

Cold and allergy symptoms.

High blood pressure; sometimes prescribed off-label for alcohol withdrawal or smoking cessation clonidine (Catapres).

Headaches and other pain Anacin, Excedrin, Midol Nicotine replacement products Smoking.

Daytime drowsiness and fatigue, disrupted REM sleep; less commonly, restlessness, early morning awakening, nightmares Corticosteroids Inflammation, asthma prednisone (Sterapred, others) Daytime jitters, insomnia Diuretics High blood pressure.

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Wakefulness that may last up to six to seven hours.

diphenhydramine (Benadryl), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) Drowsiness Motion sickness dimenhydrinate (Dramamine).

Cough, cold, and flu.

dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), methamphetamine (Desoxyn), methylphenidate (Ritalin).

Increased nighttime urination, painful calf cramps during sleep Medications containing alcohol.

theophylline (Slo-bid, Theo-Dur, others).

A number of drugs disrupt sleep, while others can cause daytime drowsiness.

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