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Sleeping pill zolpidem





Middle-of-Night Sleeping Pill Intermezzo Approved - WebMD

5/20/2014
02:51 | Author: Nick Jenkins

Sleeping pill zolpidem
Middle-of-Night Sleeping Pill Intermezzo Approved - WebMD

The FDA has approved Intermezzo, a sleeping pill designed for people Other forms of zolpidem include an under-the-tongue tablet (Edluar).

The FDA approved the pill on Wednesday. Designed by Transcept Pharmaceuticals for people who wake in the middle of the night, the drug is a fast-acting, low-dose form of zolpidem (best known as Ambien at its higher bedtime dose).

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FDA Pushes Drugmakers to Weaken Sleeping Pills - Health Articles

11/29/2014
10:38 | Author: Emma Coleman

Sleeping pill zolpidem
FDA Pushes Drugmakers to Weaken Sleeping Pills - Health Articles

Ambien, Edluar, Zolpimist and other drugs that contain the active ingredient zolpidem are the most widely used sleeping pills in the United.

Research involving data from more than 10,500 people who received sleeping pills (hypnotics) showed that "as predicted, patients prescribed any hypnotic had substantially elevated hazards of dying compared to those prescribed no hypnotics" and the association held true even when patients with poor health were taken into account – and even if the patients took fewer than 18 pills in a year. 6 The study suggested that those who take such medications are not only at higher risk for certain cancers, but are nearly four times more likely to die than people who don't take them.

For men, the FDA has “informed the manufacturers that the labeling should recommend that health care professionals consider prescribing these lower doses (5 mg for immediate-release products and 6.25 mg for extended-release products).”

Also close your bedroom door, get rid of night-lights, and refrain from turning on any light during the night, even when getting up to go to the bathroom.

An analysis of studies financed by the National Institutes of Health found that sleeping pills like Ambien, Lunesta and Sonata reduced the average time to go to sleep by just under 13 minutes compared with fake pills, while increasing total sleep time by just over 11 minutes – but, the participants believed they had slept longer, by up to one hour, when taking the pills.

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