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Traumatic brain injury





Traumatic brain injury Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo

11/21/2014
05:24 | Author: Emma Coleman

Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injury Definition - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo

Traumatic brain injury usually results from a violent blow or jolt to the head or body. An object penetrating the skull, such as a bullet or shattered piece of skull.

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Traumatic brain injury usually results from a violent blow or jolt to the head or body. An object penetrating the skull, such as a bullet or shattered piece of skull, also can cause traumatic brain injury.

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Mild traumatic brain injury may cause temporary dysfunction of brain cells. More serious traumatic brain injury can result in bruising, torn tissues, bleeding and other physical damage to the brain that can result in long-term complications or death.

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Traumatic brain injury occurs when an external mechanical force causes brain dysfunction.

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Traumatic Brain Injury

11/20/2014
03:12 | Author: Emma Coleman

Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. The impact on a person and his or her family can be.

October 19, 2014 Posts Comments.

Rehabilitation Editor Joanne Finegan, MSA, CTRS.

Medical Editor David Lenrow, M.D.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. The impact on a person and his or her family can be devastating. The purpose of this site is to educate and empower caregivers and survivors of traumatic brain injuries. This site aims to ease the transition from shock and despair at the time of a brain injury to coping and problem solving.

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Traumatic brain injury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

9/19/2014
01:32 | Author: David Perry

Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as intracranial injury, occurs when an external force traumatically injures the brain. TBI can be classified based on.

One type of focal injury, cerebral laceration, occurs when the tissue is cut or torn. Such tearing is common in orbitofrontal cortex in particular, because of bony protrusions on the interior skull ridge above the eyes. In a similar injury, cerebral contusion (bruising of brain tissue), blood is mixed among tissue. In contrast, intracranial hemorrhage involves bleeding that is not mixed with tissue.

Neuropsychological assessment can be performed to evaluate the long-term cognitive sequelae and to aid in the planning of the rehabilitation.

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CDC - Traumatic Brain Injury - Injury Center

7/18/2014
01:44 | Author: Lauren Ross

Traumatic brain injury
CDC - Traumatic Brain Injury - Injury Center

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial.

CDC’s research and programs work to prevent TBI and help people better recognize, respond, and recover if a TBI occurs.

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Injury Center Topics Saving Lives & Protecting People Home & Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Traumatic Brain Injury Injury Response Violence Prevention Data & Statistics (WISQARS) Funded Programs Communications Press Room Social Media Publications.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. In 2010 2.5 million TBIs occured either as an isolated injury or along with other injuries.1.

A TBI is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The severity of a TBI may range from “mild,” i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness to “severe,” i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury.

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Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

5/17/2014
03:40 | Author: David Perry

Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

What causes TBI? How effective are speech-language treatments for TBI? Any injury to the head may cause traumatic brain injury (TBI). There are two major.

How is TBI diagnosed?

This list is not exhaustive, and inclusion does not imply endorsement of the organization or the content of the Web site by ASHA. What causes TBI?

Penetrating Injuries: In these injuries, a foreign object (e.g., a bullet) enters the brain and causes damage to specific brain parts. This focal, or localized, damage occurs along the route the object has traveled in the brain. Symptoms vary depending on the part of the brain that is damaged.

Primary brain damage, which is damage that is complete at the time of impact, may include:

The SLP completes a formal evaluation of speech and language skills.

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