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What is the medication zolpidem used for





Sleeping Difficulty Medications - The New York Times

8/11/2014
01:25 | Author: Kayla Henderson

What is the medication zolpidem used for
Sleeping Difficulty Medications - The New York Times

Many over-the-counter sleeping medications use antihistamines, which cause drowsiness. the preferred sedative hypnotic drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Zolpidem (Ambien, Ambien CR, generic) is one of the most.

Patients should carefully read the information labels for all drugs and follow the directions. Some sleeping pills take 30 - 60 minutes to take effect, while others (such as zolpidem) act quickly. For zolpidem, patients should:

Kava. Kava has been used to relieve anxiety and improve sleep. It is not considered safe. There have been reports of liver failure and death from this herb, with highest risk in those with liver disease. Kava can interact dangerously with certain medications, including alprazolam, an anti-anxiety drug. Kava also increases the strength of certain other drugs, including other sleep medications, alcohol, and antidepressants.

Tryptophan and 5-L-5-hydroxytryptophan (HTP). Tryptophan is an amino acid used in the formation of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is associated with healthy sleep. L-tryptophan used to be marketed for insomnia and other disorders but was withdrawn after contaminated batches caused a rare and even fatal disorder called eosinophilia myalgia syndrome. 5-HTP, a byproduct of tryptophan, is still available as a supplement. There is little evidence that 5-HTP relieves insomnia. October 17, 2014 October 17, 2014 October 16, 2014 October 15, 2014 October 14, 2014.

Unfortunay, most of these drugs leave patients feeling drowsy the next day and may not be very effective in providing restful sleep. Side effects include:

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) states that there is only limited scientific evidence to show that herbal and dietary supplements are effective sleep aids. The AASM recommends that these products should be taken only if approved by a doctor. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you are considering taking any herbal or dietary supplement. Some of these products can interact with prescription medications.

The risk of tolerance and dependence is higher with this group of drugs than with non-benzodiazepine hypnotics.

Benzodiazepines used to be the most commonly prescribed sedative hypnotics. Originally developed in the 1960s to treat anxiety, these drugs nonselectively target receptor sites in the brain that modulate the effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

Interactions. As with any hypnotics, alcohol increases the sedative effects of these drugs. These hypnotics also interact with other drugs, including rifampin, ketoconazole, erythromycin, and cimetidine. They may also interfere or be interfered by other drugs. Patients should report all medications to their doctors.

Sedative hypnotics carry risks for withdrawal, dependency, and rebound insomnia. The chance of risk for these problems varies among different drugs.

In general, people with angina, heart arrhythmias, glaucoma, or problems urinating should avoid these drugs. They should not be used at the same time as medications that prevent nausea or motion sickness. Patients with chronic lung disease should also avoid some non-prescription sleeping aids, such as those containing doxylamine.

Dependency, Withdrawal Symptoms, and Rebound Insomnia. The risk for rebound insomnia, dependence, and tolerance is lower with non-benzodiazepine hypnotics than with benzodiazepine drugs. These drugs are still subject to abuse. In any case, no hypnotic should be taken for more than 7 - 10 days or at higher than the recommended dose without a doctor's approval.

Generally, manufacturers of herbal remedies and dietary supplements do not need FDA approval to sell their products. Just like a drug, herbs and supplements can affect the body's chemistry, and therefore have the potential to produce side effects that may be harmful. There have been a number of reported cases of serious and even lethal side effects from herbal products. Patients should always check with their doctors before using any herbal remedies or dietary supplements.

Withdrawal Symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms usually occur after prolonged use and indicate dependence. They can last 1 - 3 weeks after stopping the drug and may include:

Rebound Insomnia. Rebound insomnia, which often occurs after withdrawal, typically includes 1 - 2 nights of sleep disturbance, daytime sleepiness, and anxiety. In some cases, patients may experience the return of the original severe insomnia. The chances for rebound are higher with the short-acting benzodiazepines than with the longer-acting ones.

All non-benzodiazepine drugs carry labels warning that that these drugs can cause sleep-related behavior, including sleep-driving, making phone calls, and preparing and eating food while asleep. (Most cases of sleepwalking and sleep driving likely occur when patients use zolpidem along with alcohol or other drugs or take more than the recommended dose.) In addition, severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) and facial swelling (angioedema) can occur even the first time one of these drugs is taken.

Melatonin. Melatonin is the most studied dietary supplement for insomnia. It appears to reduce the time to fall asleep (sleep onset) and the time spent asleep (sleep duration). However, there are no consistent standards on melatonin doses. Some research suggests that 0.3 mg may be the most effective dosage in many people with insomnia. However, higher doses may keep some people awake and may also cause mental impairment, severe headaches, and nightmares. Although melatonin may not have many benefits for most people with chronic insomnia, studies suggest that it may help travelers with jet lag and people with delayed sleep syndrome.

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Valerian root. Valerian is an herb that has sedative qualities and is commonly used by people with insomnia. Some studies have indicated that it may help improve the quality of sleep, but there have been few rigorous and well-conducted trials to prove it is effective.

General side effects may include:

More than 1.5 million Americans use complementary and alternative therapies to treat insomnia. Many people choose herbal and dietary supplement remedies. (Valerian and melatonin are among the most popular alternative remedies for insomnia.) Some, such as chamomile tea or lemon balm, are generally harmless for most people. Others have more serious side effects and interactions.

Brands. Non-benzodiazepine hypnotics currently approved in the United States are: zolpidem.

Brands. Commonly prescribed benzodiazepines:

Side effects may differ depending on whether the benzodiazepine is long or shorting acting. They include:

Anyone who receives a prescription for these medicines will also get a patient medication guide explaining the risks of the drugs and the precautions to take. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions concerning these drugs or their potential side effects.

Brands with Antihistamines. Many over-the-counter sleeping medications use antihistamines, which cause drowsiness. Diphenhydramine is the most common antihistamine used non-prescription sleep aids. Some drugs contain diphenhydramine alone (such as Nytol, Sleep-Eez, and Sominex), while others contain combinations of diphenhydramine with pain relievers (such as Anacin P.M., Excedrin P.M., and Tylenol P.M.). Doxylamine (Unison) is another antihistamine used in sleep medications. Certain antihistamines indicated only for allergies, such as chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), diphenhydramine (Benadryl), or hydroxyzine (Atarax or Vistaril) may also be used as mild sleep-inducers.

Common Pain Relievers. When sleeplessness is caused by minor pain, simply taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), can be very helpful without causing any daytime sleepiness. The extra "P.M." antihistamine found in combination products is simply an extra, needless chemical in these situations.

About 20% or more of older American adults use some form of sleep aid, including prescription or over-the-counter drugs or alcohol. Many use such aids every night. Over-the-counter or nonprescription medications make use of the drowsiness caused by some common medications. Prescription drugs used specifically for improving sleeping are called sedative hypnotics. These drugs include benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepines.

Newer short-acting non-benzodiazepines can induce sleep with fewer side effects than benzodiazepines. Both benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics act on GABA-A receptor sites in the brain, but non-benzodiazepines are more specific in the subunits they target. Developed in the late 1980s, these drugs are now the preferred sedative hypnotic drugs for the treatment of insomnia. In general, these drugs are recommended for short-term use (7 - 10 days), and treatment should not exceed 4 weeks.

Interactions. Benzodiazepines are potentially dangerous when combined with alcohol. Some medications, like the ulcer medication cimetidine, can slow the metabolism of the benzodiazepine.

Side Effects. All of these drugs have fewer morning side effects than the benzodiazepines, including morning sedation and memory loss (although they can occur to some degree). When patients first start taking any of these drugs, they should use caution during morning activities until they are sure how the drug affects them.

Side Effects. Elderly people are more susceptible to side effects and should usually start at half the dose prescribed for younger people. They should not take long-acting forms.

Antidepressants are sometimes used to treat insomnia that may be caused by depression (secondary insomnia). In addition, some antidepressants with sedating properties are prescribed for the treatment of primary insomnia. For example, trazodone has been frequently prescribed in low doses as a hypnotic to help induce sleep. Other antidepressants used for insomnia include doxepin, trimipramine, amitriptyline, and mirtazipine. Care should be taken in the use of trazodone and other sedating antidepressants in elderly patients, due to the risk for side effects (daytime sleepiness, dizziness, and priapism) and drug interactions.

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