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Zolpidem administered alone and with alcohol





The abuse potential of zolpidem administered alone and with alcohol

6/16/2014
02:46 | Author: Emma Coleman

Zolpidem and alcohol side effects
The abuse potential of zolpidem administered alone and with alcohol

Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1998 May;60(1):193-202. The abuse potential of zolpidem administered alone and with alcohol. Wilkinson CJ. The abuse potential.

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The abuse potential of zolpidem, alone and in combination with alcohol, was examined in healthy volunteers with a history of social use of alcohol and drugs. Zolpidem, a short-acting imidazopyridine hypnotic with selectivity for a benzodiazepine receptor subtype (BZ1 or omega1), was administered double blind at 0, 10, or 15 mg with alcohol (0.75 g ethanol/kg b.wt.) or with placebo beverage in a randomized, six-way crossover design. Outcome measures included the Drug Effect Questionnaire (DEQ), the Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI-40), and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were not significantly modified by zolpidem. Relative to placebo, zolpidem and alcohol significantly (p < 0.05) increased drug strength perception, drug-liking, and drug-disliking scores on the DEQ. On the ARCI-40, zolpidem and alcohol significantly increased sedation/intoxication and dysphoria/fear scores, but did not significantly change euphoria/well-being scores. Zolpidem and alcohol were rated more unfavorably than placebo on the POMS. Alcohol did not have additive effects on the subjective ratings for zolpidem. It is concluded that, for this population and at the doses tested, the abuse potential of zolpidem appears to be modest and not increased by alcohol.

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The Abuse Potential of Zolpidem Administered Alone and With Alcohol

4/15/2014
04:52 | Author: Emma Coleman

Zolpidem and alcohol side effects
The Abuse Potential of Zolpidem Administered Alone and With Alcohol

The abuse potential of zolpidem, alone and in combination with alcohol, was examined in healthy volunteers with a history of social use of alcohol and drugs.

This article has not been cited. No articles found.

Volume 60, Issue 1, May 1998, Pages 193–202 No articles found.

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The Abuse Potential of Zolpidem Administered Alone and With Alcohol

12/24/2014
04:22 | Author: David Perry

Zolpidem and alcohol side effects
The Abuse Potential of Zolpidem Administered Alone and With Alcohol

The abuse potential of zolpidem, alone and in combination with alcohol, was azepine receptor subtype (BZ1 or omega1), was administered double blind at 0.

Volume 60, Issue 1, May 1998, Pages 193–202 No articles found.

This article has not been cited. No articles found.

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The acute effects of zolpidem, administered alone and with alcohol

10/23/2014
02:24 | Author: Lauren Ross

Zolpidem and alcohol side effects
The acute effects of zolpidem, administered alone and with alcohol

ABSTRACT Skills performance impairment after acute doses of zolpidem (a short-acting, nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic), alone and with alcohol, was evaluated.

ABSTRACT Skills performance impairment after acute doses of zolpidem (a short-acting, nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic), alone and with alcohol, was evaluated in 24 subjects. The study was designed to test whether the effects of zolpidem and alcohol are simply additive or reflect potentiation.

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The acute effects of zolpidem, administered alone and with alcohol

8/22/2014
12:10 | Author: David Perry

Paracetamol side effects nausea
The acute effects of zolpidem, administered alone and with alcohol

Skills performance impairment after acute doses of zolpidem (a short-acting, nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic), alone and with alcohol, was evaluated in 24 subjects.

Melatonin is an important regulator of the sleep-wake cycle. A prolonged-release formulation of melatonin (PR-M) that essentially mimics the profile of the endogenous production of the hormone is effective in the treatment of insomnia in patients aged 55 years and older. Because hypnotics result in impairments of various cognitive skills, it is important to examine the cognitive effects associated with the use of PR-M.

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